CDC to hold 'emergency meeting' over heart issues after COVID vaccine

BREAKING NEWS: CDC to hold ’emergency meeting’ over ‘rare but higher than expected’ cases of heart inflammation in Americans who have had Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has called an ’emergency meeting’ over 226 cases of heart inflammation in Americans who have had either the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines. 

US health officials Thursday announced they are investigating what appear to be higher than expected reports of heart inflammation in male teens and young adults after getting their second dose of the vaccine.

A total of 226 cases have been reported that may meet the CDC’s ‘working case definition’ of myocarditis and pericarditis following the shots, it said. 

Among the 226, three are in intensive care, 15 are hospitalized, and 41 have ongoing symptoms. The rest have recovered.  

Myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle, and pericarditis is inflammation of the outer lining of the heart. 

These types of heart inflammation can be caused by a variety of infections, including a bout of COVID-19, as well as certain medications.

There have been rare reports following other types of vaccinations in the past. 

It is not clear if either condition is caused by the shots and the reports of cases are extremely rare. 

More than 130 million Americans have received both their first and second doses of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. 

This means 0.00000173846 of people administered the shots have reported such an effect. 

The CDC continues to urge everyone aged 12 and older to get vaccinated. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has called an ’emergency meeting’ over 226 cases of heart inflammation in Americans who have had either the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccines

The CDC’s vaccine advisory committee will meet on June 18 to further evaluate the possible risk.       

Dr. Tom Shimabukuro told a government vaccine meeting about the investigation Thursday.

‘It’s a bit of an apples-to-oranges comparison because, again, these are preliminary reports,’ he said.

‘Not all these will turn out to be true myocarditis or pericarditis reports.’       

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