Tiffany Haddish 'set to take over Ellen DeGeneres daytime TV slot' after star announces she's quitting her show

TIFFANY Haddish is "set to take over Ellen DeGeneres' daytime TV slot" after the star announced she's quitting her show.

The 63-year-old host revealed she felt it was time to move on as she wasn't feeling challenged by hosting anymore.

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A source revealed to Page Six that Tiffany, 40, is currently "a favorite" of NBCUniversal producers.

"She has humor and empathy in spades," the source claimed.

"She's top of the list to get a daytime show — she's a fresh voice."

The Bridesmaids' actress has often filled in for Ellen, especially last October and this past April.

On Wednesday, Ellen shocked her fans when she revealed to The Hollywood Reporter that she was quitting the show next year, leaving it at 19 seasons.

She said: "It’s going to be really hard on the last day, but I also know it’s time.

"I’m a creative person, and when you’re a creative person you constantly need to be challenged, which is why I decided to host the Oscars or why I decided to go back to stand up when I didn’t think I would.

"I just needed something to challenge me. And as great as this show is, and as fun as it is, it’s just not a challenge anymore.

"I need something new to challenge me."

Despite her rather chaotic year, Ellen claimed that her quitting the show has nothing to do with the allegations made against her by crew members and guests last year.

"It almost impacted the show. It was very hurtful to me. I mean, very. But if I was quitting the show because of that, I wouldn’t have come back this season," she said.

"So, it’s not why I’m stopping but it was hard."

She continued: "With the talk show, all I cared about was spreading kindness and compassion and everything I stand for was being attacked.

"So, it destroyed me, honestly. I’d be lying if I said it didn’t. And it makes me really sad that there’s so much joy out there from negativity. It’s a culture now where there are just mean people, and it’s so foreign to me that people get joy out of that.

"Then, on the heels of it, there are allegations of a toxic workplace and, unfortunately, I learned that through the press. And at first, I didn’t believe it because I know how happy everybody is here and how every guest talks about, 'Man, you have a great place here. Of all the talk shows I’ve done, everyone here is so happy.' That’s all I’ve ever heard.

"I care tremendously. It broke my heart when I learned that people here had anything other than a fantastic experience — that people were hurt in any way.

"I check in now as much as I can through Zoom to different departments and I make sure people know that if there’s ever a question or ever anything, they can come to me and I don’t know why that was never considered before.

"I’m not a scary person. I’m really easy to talk to. So, we’ve all learned from things that we didn’t realize — or I didn’t realize — were happening. I just want people to trust and know that I am who I appear to be."

Ellen's most recent season kicked off in September 2020 and has been losing viewers ever since.

However, she might get those viewers back today as she shared a preview of her monologue, where she revealed the news to her audience as she broke down in tears.

“Today, I have an announcement to make. This season, season 19, is going to be my last season,” she said in her monologue.

The 63-year-old comedian then began to have tears swell in her eyes as she needed a moment to collect herself.  

"So the past 18 years, you have to know has changed my life. You all have changed my life.

“I am forever grateful for you for laughing, dancing and sometimes crying. This show has been the greatest experience of my life and I owe it all to you. 

“So thank you, thank you thank you,” she repeated with a bow to the virtual audience. 

Ellen said that she "thought a lot about this decision" and "sat with it for a while," adding: "Two years ago I signed a deal for three more years and I always knew in my heart that Season 19 would be my last."

She added that "19 is a great number," as the 19th Amendment gave women the right to vote and "on the periodic table, 19 is the atomic number for potassium."

Ellen said she had to trust her instincts that it's "time" to end the show, stating: "As a comedian, I have always understood the importance of… timing.

"In all seriousness, I truly have felt like next season was the right time to end this amazing chapter.

"In 1997 I knew it was time to come out on my sitcom and live my truth.

"Back then I had a vivid dream that a bird flew out of a cage and set itself free because it needed to get out of that cage and recently I had a dream that a bird- a beautiful bird with bright red feathers came to my window and whispered, 'You can still do stuff on Netflix.' And that was the sign I was looking for."

Despite the show coming to an end, Ellen "promised" her viewers that they will have "a fantastic final season" and "it will be a season where I truly get to say 'thank you."'

She concluded: "Everyday will be a celebration. There will be a lot of surprises. There will be trips down memory lane, a few detours through 'why did I wear that' ally."

During the show's absence from screen amid the coronavirus pandemic, numerous former employees accused the program of tolerating everything from bullying and racism to sexual harassment.

Ellen apologized to her staff via e-mail, saying she's "not perfect" following the firing of three top producers.

The comedian spoke to the show's staffers in a video meeting after executive producers Ed Glavin and Kevin Leman and co-executive producer Jonathan Norman were ousted amid "toxic" workplace allegations.

According to The Hollywood Reporter, Ellen said: “I care about each and every one of you. I am grateful for each and every one of you.

"I feel like I’ve kind of let the ball drop a bit because I’m focused on the show, I go in and I do the show, and I’ve just let everybody to do their jobs – to run different departments.

"And it just became a well-oiled machine, and I think that is the problem. It’s not a machine. This is people. These are human beings that are working hard every single day to put this together."

"I feel like I’ve kind of let the ball drop a bit because I’m focused on the show, I go in and I do the show, and I’ve just let everybody to do their jobs – to run different departments.

"And it just became a well-oiled machine, and I think that is the problem. It’s not a machine. This is people. These are human beings that are working hard every single day to put this together."

She added: "This show would not be what it is without all of you. It’s become the show that it is because of all of you. So if we have forgotten you somehow – any of us – I’m sorry."

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