Bake Off 2020: Matt Lucas's Boris Johnson sketch sees over 200 Ofcom complaints

Ofcom has received over 200 complaints after Matt Lucas mocked the Prime Minister Boris Johnson in the Great British Bake Off’s opening scenes.

Yes, 202 people actually took the time to report the comedy sketch, which launched this year’s series of the Paul Hollywood fronted show.

The media watchdog confirmed the news to Metro.co.uk, telling us: ‘We’ve received 202 complaints about the opening sketch.’

It’s not known whether or not the company will now investigate.

The scene that struck a nerve with viewers saw the Little Britain actor put on a blonde wig as he recreated the government’s daily briefing.

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Standing behind a podium next to a Union Jack flag, the comedian started off on a spiel while putting on his best Mr Johnson impression.

‘Right, good evening. Let’s get straight to it,’ he said behind the slogan: ‘Stay alert. Protect cake. Save loaves.’

‘We are now approaching phase 46, which means that from Tuesday morning or Wednesday evening, depending on your height, we are seeing, with regards to baking…’ the star pressed.

‘If you must bake in a tent, then bake in a tent, but please don’t bake in a tent. And we are asking people to use common sense with regards to the distribution of hundreds and thousands.’

Noel Fielding, who presents the show with Matt, video called in where he asked for the correct pronunciation of the word ‘scone’.

It was truly iconic.

Matt has replaced Sandi Toksvig this year, after the former host announced she’d be leaving the show in January.

And he’s already witnessed his first kitchen disaster after Sura sent her fellow contestant Dave’s cakes flying through the air when trying to squat a fly.

Luckily the pair made it through to next week’s episode, seeing radiographer Loriea become the first baker booted off the series.

Great British Bake Off airs Tuesdays on Channel 4 at 8pm.

What is Ofcom and what does it cover?

Ofcom is the regulator for the communications services that we use and rely on each day.

The watchdog makes sure people get the best from their broadband, home phone and mobile services, as well as keeping an eye on TV and radio.

Ofcom deals with most content on television, radio and video-on-demand services, including the BBC. However, if your complaint is about something you saw or heard in a BBC programme, you may need to complain to the BBC first.

Its rules for television and radio programmes are set out in the Broadcasting Code.

The rules in the Broadcasting Code also apply to the BBC iPlayer.

This Broadcasting Code is the rule book that broadcasters have to follow and it covers a number of areas, including; protecting the under-18s, protecting audiences from harmful and/or offensive material and ensuring that news, in whatever form, is reported with due accuracy and presented with due impartiality.

Audiences can complain to Ofcom if they believe a breach of the Broadcasting Code has been made.

Every time Ofcom receives a complaint from a viewer or listener, they assess it to see if it needs further investigation.

If Ofcom decide to investigate, they will include the case in a list of new investigations, published in the Broadcast and On Demand Bulletin.

An investigation is a formal process which can take some time depending on the complexity of the issues involved.

Ofcom can also launch investigations in the absence of a complaint from a viewer or listener.

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