How can I get a plump pout at home?

Shh! Anti-agers no one but you need know about: How can I get a plump pout at home?

  • An anonymous reader asked for advice on getting a plump pout at home
  • Inge van Lotringen recommended a plumping facial massage and lip scrub
  • British beauty expert suggested Teoxane 3D Lip Nourishing & Plumping Care

Q: I was excited about getting subtle lip filler injections — but I’ll have to wait now. What can I do to boost my lips in the meantime?

A: Boosting your lip health and condition will enhance the fullness of your lips in the long term.

Skin therapist Pietro Simone (pietrosimone.com) does a brilliant plumping facial massage and says you can easily do this for the lip area yourself, even if you already have fillers (just be extra gentle).

An anonymous reader asked British beauty expert Inge van Lotringen, for advice on achieving a plump pout at home (file image)

Wash your hands, then ‘start in the middle of your top lip, with forefingers facing each other. Make gentle pinching and outward-rolling movements along the lip line, progressing in small steps towards the outer corners,’ he says.

‘Do the same for the bottom lip. It brings blood flow and nutrients to the lips to keep them youthful and plump.’

He advises a similar pinch-and-upward roll session along your nose-to-mouth lines to prevent them deepening.

‘Once a week, use a gentle lip scrub (try L’Occitane Delicious Lip Scrubs, £15, uk.loccitane.com) and every day, treat the lip area to a product rich with peptides, humectants and antioxidants and a rich, regenerating balm.

Great dedicated lip products that will do this job are Teoxane 3D Lip Nourishing & Plumping Care, £35 (dermacaredirect.co.uk), which is said to have a visible effect within 30 minutes, and Merumaya Lip Line Restoration Treatment, £20 (merumaya.com). 

Inge (pictured) advised the reader to try a plumping facial massage and lip scrub

Email questions to Ingeborg at [email protected]

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These YouTubers Can Help You Learn To Dance During the COVID-19 Outbreak

It might be tempting to plop down on the couch for severalweeks or months of Netflix binge-watching during the coronavirusoutbreak. (And hey, have at it—the world is crazy right now!) But if yourstate has a stay-at-homeorder or you’re self-isolating,you might want to use this time to learn a new skill.

If you’ve ever wanted to learn to dance, these YouTube channels can help you get started without having to set foot inside a dance studio or even leave your house.

Mihran Kirakosian

Choreographer and dance instructor Mihran Kirakosian has nearly two million followers on YouTube, and it’s no wonder: His videos (mostly focused on hip hop and Latin dance) are geared towards dancers of nearly every level of skill and experience.

From videos of original choreography from his popular hip hop classes to step-by-step tutorials of specific dance styles and moves—like the moonwalk, shuffle, salsa, cha-cha, and more—you can use this channel to make your own at-home mini dance academy, even during COVID-19.

His breakdown of three popular hip hop moves forbeginners has garnered nearly 25 million views, so you know Kirakosian mustbe doing something right.

Monika Matys, Get Dance

You might not be able to go to a nightclub right now, butthis channel can help you learn all the best moves to make a grand entrancewhen you’re out of quarantine. If you’ve ever felt awkward about where to putyour arms when you’re dancing at a party, club, or wedding, Monika Matys canhelp you out with these simple tutorials.

Unlike the tutorials on some of the otherYouTube channels on this list, these videos focus on the ultimate basics ofsocial dancing. Follow these step-by-step guides to learn about hip rolls, movingyour shoulders, getting a sense of rhythm (or at least faking it), starting tofreestyle, and loosening your body so you don’t feel so tense the next time youhit the dance floor.

Auti Kamal

Auti Kamal,a dance vlogger whose YouTube channel is growing quickly, focuses primarily onballet, lyrical, contemporary, and jazz routines for beginners. Find tips andtricks on pirouettes, doing the splits, easy lifts, and leg holds you can startpracticing from home.

She’s best known for her beginning ballet series, which canhelp you learn basic ballet vocabulary and steps if you never got the chance totake classes as a kid (or if you’re getting back into it after a long hiatus).

Leon Turetsky, Passion4Dancing

Quarantined during the COVID-19outbreak with your partner—or at least a roommate who’s willing to dancewith you? Try your hand at ballroom dancing in various styles with instructor Leon Turetsky. The livelessons (in dances like East Coast and West Coast swing, salsa, waltz, quickstep,the foxtrot, cha cha, bachata, and more) often feel like virtual parties, whichis what we all need a little more of right now.

You can also learn most of the footwork and steps byyourself, so you can get ready to sweep your date off your feet later on.

Mandy Jiroux

Mandy Jiroux was once famous for being besties with Miley Cyrus, but she’s made a name for herself now as a popular dance YouTuber. Many of her original choreography videos and step-by-step breakdowns of fun routines to hit pop songs have gotten over 20 million views.

Most of the routines are accessible for beginners, so you don’t have to have a ton of dance experience to follow along. Make sure to check out the mirrored versions of the choreography if you’re still getting used to learning new routines.

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Can you see the snow leopard prowling over this ice-covered mountainside? – The Sun

THESE aerial shots, captured by a wildlife photographer, look as though there is no wildlife to be seen in them at all.

But at a closer look, a snow leopard can be spotted making its way through the snowy plains of the national park.



Photographer Booby-Jo Vial took these pictures while on a photo safari in Kibber National Park in India.

Snow leopards are known for blending into the snow conditions they live in and Bobby-Jo, from Dubbo, Australia, managed to capture the pictures of how well they can hide.

The incredible pictures were taken in late February and prove that the big cats live up to their nickname, "ghost cat".

Kibber National Park hosts up to 30 snow leopards that roam freely amongst the snow-covered mountains.

The big cats are now considered vulnerable due to climate change, habitat fragmentation and retaliatory killings.

The WWF predicts that there are only up to 6,000 wild snow leopards left in the world, making them a rate sighting.



Mr Vial, the co-director of Duma Safaris, said: "The snow Leopard is the holy grail of wildlife photography and I have always dreamed of seeing one in the wild.

"I also used to care for snow leopards in my early zoo-keeping career. They are a spectacular big cat and have quite the reputation of being incredibly elusive to observe in the wild.

"We were incredibly fortunate to spend three days with a very old male snow leopard.

"His camouflage really surprised me. He was really obvious when walking against the snow but as soon as he moved in front of rocks he would completely disappear!

"I would be looking through my viewfinder and be tracking him and then he would just disappears! It was amazing and also frustrating.

"A few days after we left Kibber we received news that the old male snow leopard had fallen to his death chasing an Ibex down the side of the gorge.

"Fantastic organisations like the Snow Leopard Trust are helping protect Snow Leopards through conservation, research and education".






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Can you name the Premier League players by their past?

How well do you know the past of some of today’s Premier League footballers? Time to find out.

We have taken a player from each Premier League club and described them by the list of teams they have played for. Now all you have to do is guess their identity.

Twenty players. 10 minutes. Simple, right?

Let’s see how you get on. Good luck.

Can you name these current Premier League players by their club history?

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Can pets get coronavirus? How to look after your dogs and cats

THERE has been a lot of confusion over whether pets can catch or carry coronavirus, with global officials saying that it wasn't possible.

Then two dogs in Hong Kong were diagnosed recently, with one of them even dying from it, and a Belgian cat caught it off her owner.

⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates

Can pets get coronavirus?

Generally no. Experts have previously said that pets cannot contract coronavirus, but, as with humans, they could pick it up from surfaces just like we can.

Widespread advice has been given globally reassuring pet owners not to worry about their pets during the pandemic.

Official Government lines published on March 27 state that "There is no evidence of coronavirus circulating in pets or other animals in the UK and there is nothing to suggest animals may transmit the disease to humans.

"However, in line with the general advice on fighting coronavirus, you should wash your hands regularly, including before and after contact with animals."

There have been extremely rare cases, such as two dogs that contracted the virus in Hong Kong.

In both cases, the dogs contracted the virus from their owner, the first dog that caught it-died just two days after being released from mandatory quarantine on February 26.

There has also been a single case in Belgium of a woman giving her cat the virus a week after she started showing symptoms, but this is the first case in Europe and the cat is now fine.

The World Organisation for Animal Health has reiterated that there is no evidence to suggest pets can pass the virus to their owners.

A spokesperson from Belgium's National Council for Animal Protection said: “Let's not go back to a dark medieval period when ignorant people hunt and kill cats for fear that they will pass on the plague.”

Please do not abandon or stop giving your animals attention.

Can I still take my pet to the vet during lockdown?

All non-essential trips to vets should be avoided.

If your pet needs urgent treatment, you must phone the vet to arrange the best approach to meet your pets’ needs.

What should you do about walking the dog if you think you may be infected?

If your dog cannot exercise at home, you should ask someone outside of your household to walk your dog for you.

If you do not have symptoms of coronavirus:

You may leave your house to exercise once a day and you should combine this with walking your dog.

It is important that you minimise the time spent outside of the home and remain two metres away from anyone outside of your household.

Remember to wash your hands and remain 2 metres away from anyone outside your household.

Walking someone else's dog:

This counts as caring for a vulnerable person, which includes those self-isolating or being shielded.

Remember to wash your hands before and after handling the dog and keep two metres away from other people and animals while walking, including when handing over the dog to the owner.

Have pets been tested for Covid-19?

A Pomeranian in Hong Kong was found to have traces of Covid-19 after its owner was diagnosed with the new virus.

The weak positive test "simply means that a small piece of viral genome was detected in a sample," says vet Sarah Caddy, a clinical research fellow in viral immunology at the University of Cambridge.

A test used to detect genetic material "is a highly sensitive method of testing but is unable to tell whether coronavirus was replicating in the dog or whether the dog had simply licked contaminated surfaces in the home", she added.

And Dr Jessica May, UK lead vet at video service FirstVet, explained: "The most likely reason for the dog to have mildly positive results was due to breathing contaminated air from the owner.

"However, the dog was not showing clinical signs."

In the US, IDEXX Laboratories Inc evaluated thousands of canine and feline specimens during validation of a new veterinary test system for the Covid-19 virus.

The lab reported today that results echoed "the current expert understanding that Covid-19 is primarily transmitted person-to-person and supports the recommendation against testing pets for the Covid-19 virus."

What if pet owners are still worried about Covid-19?

For dogs or cats with respiratory problems, the experts' recommendation is to contact a vet to test for more common respiratory pathogens.

Jay Mazelsky, CEO of IDEXX Laboratories, said: "Pets are important members of our family, and we want to keep them healthy and safe."

Dr Jessica May has recommended pet owners should seek advice "if you fear that your pet is infected with a strain of coronavirus."

To try and keep you and your pets safe, you should keep social distancing from others and follow any guidelines given by the RSPCA during coronavirus.

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Can you catch coronavirus from food? – The Sun

WITH lockdown in full force in the UK amid the coronavirus pandemic, you may find the only time you leave your home is for a quick trip to the supermarket.

Coronavirus is highly contagious – with the number of those infected in the UK rising to 14,579 today and the death toll standing at 759. 

⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates

And as you meander down the grocery aisle you may find yourself asking whether you can actually catch coronavirus from food.

Well, according to the UK Government, it is very unlikely that you can catch the deadly bug from food.

They write on their website: "Covid-19 is a respiratory illness. It is not known to be transmitted by exposure to food or food packaging."

However, they say while it is very unlikely that coronavirus is transmitted through food, as a matter of good hygiene practice anyone handling food should wash their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

They add: "This should be done as a matter of routine, before and after handling food, and especially after being in a public place, blowing their nose, coughing, or sneezing."

The Food and Drug Administration in the US also claim there’s no evidence of Covid-19 transmitting through food or packaging.

On top of this, Stephen Baker, from the Department of Medicine at the University of Cambridge, said viruses – unlike bacteria – do not survive well outside the body.

He pointed out that while the virus will survive on food as it would do on other surfaces – it then dies off, according to Prof Baker.

And he revealed the virus cannot replicate or produce more copies of itself on food.

The professor admitted it is difficult to predict how long it would survive on different foods, but stressed: "There is no reason to think the virus would be able to survive on food longer than any other surface."

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The risk posed by eating food contaminated with small amounts of the virus would also be "really low".

Benjamin Chapman, a professor and food safety specialist at North Carolina State University, told Live Science the virus probably wouldn’t survive digestion because of the stomach’s acidity.

If you're worried, the best thing to do is wash fresh fruit and vegetables as normal and wipe down the packages food comes in with a wet wipe.

Instead of food being a problem, it is surfaces such as door handles, lift buttons, petrol pumps and letter boxes that are more of a concern.

Coronavirus is said to be able to survive on these surfaces for 72 hours – and if someone sneezes on to their hands and then touches a lift button or touches a door handle, then that's going to be the bigger problem.

Prof Sally Bloomfield, Honorary Professor, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said: "Any virus contamination would come from someone who has contaminated hands, handling the items whilst they are being handled for delivery.

"Although hands and hand contact surfaces are thought to be a major contributor to spread, the main risk comes from ‘hand contact surfaces recently and frequently touched by many other people."

Health bosses say the best way to protect yourself from catching the bug in this way is to wash your hands with soap and water for the time it takes to sing Happy Birthday twice.

Happy Birthday takes about 20 seconds to sing twice and is said to be the perfect number to clean your hands to thoroughly.

You should also not touch your eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands and avoid close contact with people who are sick.

Cleaning and disinfecting objects and surfaces which you may have touched is also important.

Dr Daniel Atkinson, clinical lead at Treated.com, said: "Hygiene is incredibly important to ward off any viruses.

"Make sure to wash your hands thoroughly – for at least 20 seconds – and cover your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze.

"If you can, avoid contact with sick people and avoid shaking hands with anyone displaying flu-like symptoms."

Globally, there are currently over 435,000 cases of coronavirus and nearly 20,000 deaths from the bug worldwide.

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Brits can go out to get pet food, give blood or volunteer during coronavirus lockdown – full list of exceptions


BRITS will be allowed to go out to get pet food, volunteer or give blood during the lockdown, it's been confirmed today.

As part of new laws which came into power today, the Government laid out all the exceptions to the three-week lockdown.

⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates

Boris Johnson has said earlier this week that no one should be going out unless they wanted to get food, medicine, for exercise once a day, or to help a vulnerable person.

And they should only be going to work if they can't work from home too, he said.

Today Matt Hancock signed emergency rules into law to cover the lockdown, which force people to stay inside.

Police will have the power to slap people with a £60 on the spot fine – which could rise to up to £1000 for repeat offenders.

The Government has warned that they could raise this to unlimited levels if people still don't obey.

The new regulations laid out all the exceptions to the rules in black and white.

Brits are able to go out of the house to get necessities for anyone in the house – that includes beloved pets too.

And if anything vital for your home breaks too, you will be allowed to leave to buy things to fix it, or get a new one.

Thankfully, members of the public will be allowed out to volunteer, and to give blood too.

More than half a million Brits have signed up to be an NHS volunteer in the last 24 hours alone as the country clubbed together to do their bit.


Reasons you CAN leave the house:

– To obtain basic necessities, including food and medical supplies for those in the same household (including any pets) or for vulnerable persons
– To collect supplies for the essential upkeep, maintenance and functioning of the household, the household of a vulnerable person, or to obtain money
– To exercise either alone or with other members of their household
– To seek medical assistance or attend medical appointment
– To provide care or emergency help to a vunerable person
– To donate blood
– To volunteer or do charity work
– To attend the funeral of family or someone you live with
– To go to court or satify bail conditions
– To access childcare
– To take kids to visit the other parent if separated
– To move house where reasonably necessary
– To go to a place of worship if a religious leader
– To access DWP services or victims of crime services
– To avoid injury or escape harm

Brits in the process of moving home have been told to stay put if they can.

However, if they are just about to move and have no other option, the new laws do allow it.

People will also be allowed out to go to court, access childcare, or take kids around to the other parents' if they are separated.

The rules also clarifies when you can gather in a group.

Boris this week banned gatherings of more than two people except in some circumstances.

When providing care to vulnerable people or emergencies, it is allowed.

And if you need to attend a family members' funeral or it can't be avoided for work, people won't face any action.

Business will also face fines if they stay open when they should have closed.

You can only meet more than two people if:

– You're part of the same household
– Where its essential for work purposes
– When attending a funeral
– When moving house
– When providing care to a vulnerable person
– When providing emergency help
– When participaing in legal proceedings or legal obligations

CORONAVIRUS CRISIS – STAY IN THE KNOW

Don't miss the latest news and figures – and essential advice for you and your family.

To receive The Sun's Coronavirus newsletter in your inbox every tea time, sign up here.

To follow us on Facebook, simply 'Like' our Coronavirus page.

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Source: Read Full Article

Brits can go out to get pet food, give blood or volunteer during coronavirus lockdown – full list of exceptions


BRITS will be allowed to go out to get pet food, volunteer or give blood during the lockdown, it's been confirmed today.

As part of new laws which came into power today, the Government laid out all the exceptions to the three-week lockdown.

⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates

Boris Johnson has said earlier this week that no one should be going out unless they wanted to get food, medicine, for exercise once a day, or to help a vulnerable person.

And they should only be going to work if they can't work from home too, he said.

Today Matt Hancock signed emergency rules into law to cover the lockdown, which force people to stay inside.

Police will have the power to slap people with a £60 on the spot fine – which could rise to up to £1000 for repeat offenders.

The Government has warned that they could raise this to unlimited levels if people still don't obey.

The new regulations laid out all the exceptions to the rules in black and white.

Brits are able to go out of the house to get necessities for anyone in the house – that includes beloved pets too.

And if anything vital for your home breaks too, you will be allowed to leave to buy things to fix it, or get a new one.

Thankfully, members of the public will be allowed out to volunteer, and to give blood too.

More than half a million Brits have signed up to be an NHS volunteer in the last 24 hours alone as the country clubbed together to do their bit.


Reasons you CAN leave the house:

– To obtain basic necessities, including food and medical supplies for those in the same household (including any pets) or for vulnerable persons
– To collect supplies for the essential upkeep, maintenance and functioning of the household, the household of a vulnerable person, or to obtain money
– To exercise either alone or with other members of their household
– To seek medical assistance or attend medical appointment
– To provide care or emergency help to a vunerable person
– To donate blood
– To volunteer or do charity work
– To attend the funeral of family or someone you live with
– To go to court or satify bail conditions
– To access childcare
– To take kids to visit the other parent if separated
– To move house where reasonably necessary
– To go to a place of worship if a religious leader
– To access DWP services or victims of crime services
– To avoid injury or escape harm

Brits in the process of moving home have been told to stay put if they can.

However, if they are just about to move and have no other option, the new laws do allow it.

People will also be allowed out to go to court, access childcare, or take kids around to the other parents' if they are separated.

The rules also clarifies when you can gather in a group.

Boris this week banned gatherings of more than two people except in some circumstances.

When providing care to vulnerable people or emergencies, it is allowed.

And if you need to attend a family members' funeral or it can't be avoided for work, people won't face any action.

Business will also face fines if they stay open when they should have closed.

You can only meet more than two people if:

– You're part of the same household
– Where its essential for work purposes
– When attending a funeral
– When moving house
– When providing care to a vulnerable person
– When providing emergency help
– When participaing in legal proceedings or legal obligations

CORONAVIRUS CRISIS – STAY IN THE KNOW

Don't miss the latest news and figures – and essential advice for you and your family.

To receive The Sun's Coronavirus newsletter in your inbox every tea time, sign up here.

To follow us on Facebook, simply 'Like' our Coronavirus page.

Get Britain's best-selling newspaper delivered to your smartphone or tablet each day – find out more.

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How long can coronavirus live on surfaces? – The Sun


CLEANLINESS is of vital importance as we keep ourselves safe in the fight against the spread of coronavirus.

But how long does Covid-19 live on surfaces and how can you combat it? Here's all you need to know.

⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates

How long does coronavirus survive on surfaces?

Droplets of the Covid-19 infection can live on hard surfaces for up to 72 hours, according to Professor Chris Witty.

He said: "Just touching it will not give you the virus: it is if you touch it and then touch your face, having not washed your hands between them.

"So, if you go on the Tube and touch the rail, that's fine, but just be aware of what you do with your hands.

"Don't touch your face, wash your hands and then you can do what you like."

However, he said they would be "largely gone" within 48 hours in most cases.

Covid-19 can be spread in tiny droplets released from the nose and mouth – with a single cough releasing up to 3,000 droplets.

These particles can land on other people, surfaces and clothing, but some smaller particles can remain in the air.

CORONAVIRUS CRISIS – STAY IN THE KNOW

Don't miss the latest news and figures – and essential advice for you and your family.

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Does the type of surface vary?

A new study has found that the difference in material can alter the life-span of the virus.

It can live in air for three hours, on copper for four hours and cardboard for up to 24 hours.

Plastic is the worst offender, with the virus lasting up to three days.

The ideal surface for the virus is plastic, which allows it to stay for up to three days.

How to clean your home

Experts have said that people should be wiping their homes down with antibacterial wipes and sprays every day.

Homeowners should be looking for products that kill 99.9 percent of germs.

For those who don't have cleaning sprays or wipes, washing with hot water and dish soap will remove coronavirus and other germs from surfaces.

'High-touch' surfaces that should be sanitised every day include:

  • Doorknobs
  • Light switches
  • Refrigerator and microwave doors
  • Drawer pulls
  • TV remote
  • Counters and tabletops
  • Toilet handles
  • Tap handles

 

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'You can get through this': Mother's reassurance over coronavirus

‘If I lost focus on my breathing, I felt like I was drowning’: Father-of-two, 29, in later stages of coronavirus recovery gives stark warning to Britons ignoring social distancing advice

  • Laura Jacobs caught coronavirus from her mother following a holiday in Italy
  • The NHS admin worker, 31, fell ill with the virus alongside her husband, Matthew
  • Assured families they can ‘get through this’ as pandemic worsens across the UK 
  • Coronavirus symptoms: what are they and should you see a doctor?

A father-of-two recovering from coronavirus has issued a stark warning to young people who think they will not be affected by the disease.

Daryl Doblados, from Littleport in Cambridgeshire, was diagnosed with Covid-19 on March 19.

He woke up aching, with a high temperature, sore throat and shortness of breath, before being taken to Addenbrooke’s Hospital. 

The 29-year-old said it felt like his lungs were ‘filling up with smoke’ as he struggled to breathe. 

Warning others to take care and abide by social distancing guidelines, he said: ‘Do not take this for granted, it’s really not a joke.’ 

Daryl Doblados, from Littleport in Cambridgeshire, was diagnosed with Covid-19 on March 19.

The 29-year-old said it felt like his lungs were ‘filling up with smoke’ as he struggled to breathe. Warning others to take care and abide by social distancing guidelines, he said: ‘Do not take this for granted, it’s really not a joke.’

Mr Doblados said that even as a healthy 29-year-old he was still ‘floored’ by what the doctors considered a mild case of coronavirus.

He is now self-isolating, staying away from his partner and two young children.

Mr Doblados said: ‘I was consistently trying to focus on my breathing because once I lost control of the breathing, I felt like I was drowning. 

‘It feels like your lungs are filling up with smoke or liquid and it’s a real struggle to breathe. I’ve never felt anything like this.

‘I really feel for those who contracted a severe or critical case. It’s really the breathing problem that gets to you and I’ve only got a mild case. I’m in seven days of isolation in my bedroom.’ 

NHS worker Laura Jacobs, 31, with her husband Matthew and their children. The couple were struck down with Covid-19 

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF CORONAVIRUS?

Like other coronaviruses, including those that cause the common cold and that triggered SARS, COVID-19 is a respiratory illness.  

  • The most common symptoms are: 
  • Fever 
  • Dry cough 
  • Shortness of breath
  • Difficulty breathing 
  • Fatigue 

Although having a runny nose doesn’t rule out coronavirus, it doesn’t thus far appear to be a primary symptom. 

Most people only become mildly ill, but the infection can turn serious and even deadly, especially for those who are older or have underlying health conditions.  

In these cases, patients develop pneumonia, which can cause: 

  • Potentially with yellow, green or bloody mucus
  • Fever, sweating and shaking chills
  • Shortness of breath 
  • Rapid or shallow breathing 
  • Pain when breathing, especially when breathing deeply or coughing 
  • Low appetite, energy and fatigue 
  • Nausea and vomiting (more common in children) 
  • Confusion (more common in elderly people)
  • Some patients have also reported diarrhea and kidney failure has occassionally been a complication. 

Avoid people with these symtpoms. If you develop them, call your health care provider before going to the hospital or doctor, so they and you can prepare to minimize possivle exposure if they suspect you have coronavirus.  

 

Meanwhile, a mother who recovered from coronavirus is also sharing her experience to reassure other parents and help them deal with the illness.  

NHS worker Laura Jacobs, 31, caught Covid-19 from her own mother after she returned from a holiday in Italy last month.

The mother-of-two, from Neath in South Wales, quickly fell ill alongside her husband and suffered a fever, aches, a tight chest and tiredness. 

She battled coronavirus alongside her mother Melissa Powell and husband Matthew.

The 31-year-ols said: ‘My symptoms came from nowhere. I felt absolutely fine at work and then bang, all of the symptoms arrived at once.

‘I had a high fever, shivers, intense aching pains in my back and neck, sore throat, painfully tight chest and fatigue.’

The mother-of-two, who works in admin at Morriston Hospital in Swansea, South Wales, said her five-year-old daughter Ava and 10-month-old Miles were also tested.

She added: ‘I wanted people to see that you shouldn’t take it lightly but I think people just want reassurance.

‘My mum had been to Italy and went to an area that wasn’t infected at the time, there were no reported cases.

‘They came back on February 22, and within three days started showing symptoms and then I caught it off her.’

But her mother suffered with worse symptoms because she has a history of pneumonia.

Mrs Jacobs added: ‘At first I thought I had the flu, I knew it wasn’t a cold.  

‘A community nurse came to the house in protective clothing, a mask and visor. 

‘She tested me, my husband and children at the same time. 

‘The kids came back as negative and we were surprised because we are round them all the time, giving them hugs and kisses.’ 

Mrs Jacobs caught Covid-19 from her own mother after she returned from a holiday in Italy last month

She added: ‘The worst was the fever for days, high temperature shivers, horrible aching up my back and around my neck, you feel like you can’t move, you’re exhausted. 

‘The fever is definitely the worst bit.’

Her husband Matthew, 35, was also hit worse as he has asthma and developed viral pneumonia so was admitted to Morriston Hospital overnight.

Mrs Jacobs said: ‘He is on the mend the past two days, he’s eating more. 

‘My consultant is quite confident that once you have had it once you won’t have it again.’

In other major developments today: 

  • The government has suspended rail franchises to maintain services, as operators faced collapse with passenger numbers tumbling;
  • Mr Hancock has insisted he will ensure that NHS staff get all the personal protection equipment they need, amid fear they are currently ‘lambs to the slaughter’ when treating patients;
  • The government has formally warned Britons flocking to campsites and holiday homes away from cities that it does not count as ‘essential travel;  
  • Chancellor Rishi Sunak is preparing a fresh economic bailout for five-million self-employed amid warnings thousands of sole traders will not survive the crisis;
  • The Lord Chief Justice, Lord Burnett, has said no new trials will start and that ongoing trials will be paused while arrangements are put in place so they can continue safely; 
  • Health minister Nadine Dorries, the first MP confirmed with coronavirus, has returned to work after recovering from the illness; 
  • The government is pushing emergency legislation through the Commons today, but Tory and Labour MPs have secured more checks on the measures including a fresh vote in six months; 
  • Research has suggested that the government’s current policy could still result in up to 70,000 deaths from coronavirus; 

    WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT THE CORONAVIRUS?

    What is the coronavirus? 

    A coronavirus is a type of virus which can cause illness in animals and people. Viruses break into cells inside their host and use them to reproduce itself and disrupt the body’s normal functions. Coronaviruses are named after the Latin word ‘corona’, which means crown, because they are encased by a spiked shell which resembles a royal crown.

    The coronavirus from Wuhan is one which has never been seen before this outbreak. It has been named SARS-CoV-2 by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. The name stands for Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus 2.

    Experts say the bug, which has killed around one in 50 patients since the outbreak began in December, is a ‘sister’ of the SARS illness which hit China in 2002, so has been named after it.

    The disease that the virus causes has been named COVID-19, which stands for coronavirus disease 2019.

    Dr Helena Maier, from the Pirbright Institute, said: ‘Coronaviruses are a family of viruses that infect a wide range of different species including humans, cattle, pigs, chickens, dogs, cats and wild animals. 

    ‘Until this new coronavirus was identified, there were only six different coronaviruses known to infect humans. Four of these cause a mild common cold-type illness, but since 2002 there has been the emergence of two new coronaviruses that can infect humans and result in more severe disease (Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronaviruses). 

    ‘Coronaviruses are known to be able to occasionally jump from one species to another and that is what happened in the case of SARS, MERS and the new coronavirus. The animal origin of the new coronavirus is not yet known.’ 

    The first human cases were publicly reported from the Chinese city of Wuhan, where approximately 11million people live, after medics first started publicly reporting infections on December 31.

    By January 8, 59 suspected cases had been reported and seven people were in critical condition. Tests were developed for the new virus and recorded cases started to surge.

    The first person died that week and, by January 16, two were dead and 41 cases were confirmed. The next day, scientists predicted that 1,700 people had become infected, possibly up to 7,000. 

    Where does the virus come from?

    According to scientists, the virus almost certainly came from bats. Coronaviruses in general tend to originate in animals – the similar SARS and MERS viruses are believed to have originated in civet cats and camels, respectively.

    The first cases of COVID-19 came from people visiting or working in a live animal market in Wuhan, which has since been closed down for investigation.

    Although the market is officially a seafood market, other dead and living animals were being sold there, including wolf cubs, salamanders, snakes, peacocks, porcupines and camel meat. 

    A study by the Wuhan Institute of Virology, published in February 2020 in the scientific journal Nature, found that the genetic make-up virus samples found in patients in China is 96 per cent identical to a coronavirus they found in bats.

    However, there were not many bats at the market so scientists say it was likely there was an animal which acted as a middle-man, contracting it from a bat before then transmitting it to a human. It has not yet been confirmed what type of animal this was.

    Dr Michael Skinner, a virologist at Imperial College London, was not involved with the research but said: ‘The discovery definitely places the origin of nCoV in bats in China.

    ‘We still do not know whether another species served as an intermediate host to amplify the virus, and possibly even to bring it to the market, nor what species that host might have been.’  

    So far the fatalities are quite low. Why are health experts so worried about it? 

    Experts say the international community is concerned about the virus because so little is known about it and it appears to be spreading quickly.

    It is similar to SARS, which infected 8,000 people and killed nearly 800 in an outbreak in Asia in 2003, in that it is a type of coronavirus which infects humans’ lungs. It is less deadly than SARS, however, which killed around one in 10 people, compared to approximately one in 50 for COVID-19.

    Another reason for concern is that nobody has any immunity to the virus because they’ve never encountered it before. This means it may be able to cause more damage than viruses we come across often, like the flu or common cold.

    Speaking at a briefing in January, Oxford University professor, Dr Peter Horby, said: ‘Novel viruses can spread much faster through the population than viruses which circulate all the time because we have no immunity to them.

    ‘Most seasonal flu viruses have a case fatality rate of less than one in 1,000 people. Here we’re talking about a virus where we don’t understand fully the severity spectrum but it’s possible the case fatality rate could be as high as two per cent.’

    If the death rate is truly two per cent, that means two out of every 100 patients who get it will die. 

    ‘My feeling is it’s lower,’ Dr Horby added. ‘We’re probably missing this iceberg of milder cases. But that’s the current circumstance we’re in.

    ‘Two per cent case fatality rate is comparable to the Spanish Flu pandemic in 1918 so it is a significant concern globally.’

    How does the virus spread?

    The illness can spread between people just through coughs and sneezes, making it an extremely contagious infection. And it may also spread even before someone has symptoms.

    It is believed to travel in the saliva and even through water in the eyes, therefore close contact, kissing, and sharing cutlery or utensils are all risky. It can also live on surfaces, such as plastic and steel, for up to 72 hours, meaning people can catch it by touching contaminated surfaces.

    Originally, people were thought to be catching it from a live animal market in Wuhan city. But cases soon began to emerge in people who had never been there, which forced medics to realise it was spreading from person to person. 

    What does the virus do to you? What are the symptoms?

    Once someone has caught the COVID-19 virus it may take between two and 14 days, or even longer, for them to show any symptoms – but they may still be contagious during this time.

    If and when they do become ill, typical signs include a runny nose, a cough, sore throat and a fever (high temperature). The vast majority of patients will recover from these without any issues, and many will need no medical help at all.

    In a small group of patients, who seem mainly to be the elderly or those with long-term illnesses, it can lead to pneumonia. Pneumonia is an infection in which the insides of the lungs swell up and fill with fluid. It makes it increasingly difficult to breathe and, if left untreated, can be fatal and suffocate people.

    Figures are showing that young children do not seem to be particularly badly affected by the virus, which they say is peculiar considering their susceptibility to flu, but it is not clear why. 

    What have genetic tests revealed about the virus? 

    Scientists in China have recorded the genetic sequences of around 19 strains of the virus and released them to experts working around the world. 

    This allows others to study them, develop tests and potentially look into treating the illness they cause.   

    Examinations have revealed the coronavirus did not change much – changing is known as mutating – much during the early stages of its spread.

    However, the director-general of China’s Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Gao Fu, said the virus was mutating and adapting as it spread through people.

    This means efforts to study the virus and to potentially control it may be made extra difficult because the virus might look different every time scientists analyse it.   

    More study may be able to reveal whether the virus first infected a small number of people then change and spread from them, or whether there were various versions of the virus coming from animals which have developed separately.

    How dangerous is the virus?  

    The virus has a death rate of around two per cent. This is a similar death rate to the Spanish Flu outbreak which, in 1918, went on to kill around 50million people.

    Experts have been conflicted since the beginning of the outbreak about whether the true number of people who are infected is significantly higher than the official numbers of recorded cases. Some people are expected to have such mild symptoms that they never even realise they are ill unless they’re tested, so only the more serious cases get discovered, making the death toll seem higher than it really is.

    However, an investigation into government surveillance in China said it had found no reason to believe this was true.

    Dr Bruce Aylward, a World Health Organization official who went on a mission to China, said there was no evidence that figures were only showing the tip of the iceberg, and said recording appeared to be accurate, Stat News reported.

    Can the virus be cured? 

    The COVID-19 virus cannot be cured and it is proving difficult to contain.

    Antibiotics do not work against viruses, so they are out of the question. Antiviral drugs can work, but the process of understanding a virus then developing and producing drugs to treat it would take years and huge amounts of money.

    No vaccine exists for the coronavirus yet and it’s not likely one will be developed in time to be of any use in this outbreak, for similar reasons to the above.

    The National Institutes of Health in the US, and Baylor University in Waco, Texas, say they are working on a vaccine based on what they know about coronaviruses in general, using information from the SARS outbreak. But this may take a year or more to develop, according to Pharmaceutical Technology.

    Currently, governments and health authorities are working to contain the virus and to care for patients who are sick and stop them infecting other people.

    People who catch the illness are being quarantined in hospitals, where their symptoms can be treated and they will be away from the uninfected public.

    And airports around the world are putting in place screening measures such as having doctors on-site, taking people’s temperatures to check for fevers and using thermal screening to spot those who might be ill (infection causes a raised temperature).

    However, it can take weeks for symptoms to appear, so there is only a small likelihood that patients will be spotted up in an airport.

    Is this outbreak an epidemic or a pandemic?   

    The outbreak was declared a pandemic on March 11. A pandemic is defined by the World Health Organization as the ‘worldwide spread of a new disease’. 

    Previously, the UN agency said most cases outside of Hubei had been ‘spillover’ from the epicentre, so the disease wasn’t actually spreading actively around the world.

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