Surgeon General: This will be 'saddest week of most Americans' lives'

‘This is our Pearl Harbor moment’: Surgeon General Jerome Adams says coronavirus is defining moment for this generation, claiming this will be ‘the hardest and the saddest week of most Americans’ lives’ as death toll is expected to peak next Thursday

  • The U.S. Surgeon General said Sunday that the next two weeks will be the ‘hardest and saddest’ due to devastation from the coronavirus outbreak
  • ‘This is going to be the hardest and the saddest week of most Americans’ lives, quite frankly,’ Jerome Adams told Fox News Sunday
  • He also likened the coronavirus pandemic to Pearl Harbor and the September 11 terrorist attacks, claiming the outbreak will define this generation 
  • An analytical prediction shows that deaths and cases of coronavirus int he U.S. will peak on April 16, which is next Thursday
  • This assessment assumed that Americans comply with stay-at-home and lockdown recommendations and orders from federal and local governments 

Jerome Adams, the U.S. Surgeon General, said Sunday the next two weeks will be the ‘hardest and saddest’ of most Americans’ lives as the deaths from coronavirus are expected to peak next Thursday.

‘This is going to be the hardest and the saddest week of most Americans’ lives, quite frankly,’ Adams told Fox News Sunday.

‘This is going to be our Pearl Harbor moment, our 9/11 moment – only it’s not going to be localized, it’s going to be happening all over the country. And I want America to understand that,’ he continued in his warning to Americans.

He reiterated his point during an interview with NBC’s Meet the Press Sunday morning, claiming coronavirus will be the defining moment for this generation and ‘hardest moment for many Americans in their entire lives.’

According to a model created by the University of Washington’s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, coronavirus will reach its peak on April 16 in the U.S.

Surgeon General Jerome Adams said Sunday that the next two weeks will be the ‘hardest and saddest of most Americans’ lives’ as coronavirus is expected to peak next Thursday

‘This is going to be our Pearl Harbor moment, our 9/11 moment,’ he told Fox News in claiming the coronavirus pandemic will be a defining moment for this generation

The peak, Adams said on NBC’s Meet the Press Sunday morning, will likely be April 16 as long as Americans comply with stay-at-home orders and listen to recommendations from the White House task force and CDC – including new recommendations that everyone wear a mask when they are in public

‘We really need to understand that if we want to flatten that curve and get through to the other side, everyone needs to do their part,’ Adams asserted to NBC’s Chuck Todd. ‘Ninety percent of Americans are doing their part, even in the states where they haven’t had a shelter in place. But if you can’t give us 30 days, governors, give us, give us a week, give us what you can, so that we don’t overwhelm our healthcare systems over this next week. And then let’s reassess at that point.’

‘We want everyone to understand you’ve got to be Rosie The Riveter you’ve got to do your part,’ he continued.

Adams was specifically calling responding to governors who have not yet issued stay-at-home or lockdown orders in their respective states yet.

Arkansas, Iowa, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota have no known lockdown orders in place – while Utah, Wyoming, Oklahoma and North Carolina do not have state-wide orders, but some counties and cities have issued their own.

Eight of the states are run by Republican governors – with North Carolina the only exception. 

The U.S. death toll surpassed 8,500 by Sunday morning and there are more than 312,000 confirmed cases – more than any other nation is reporting.

At the end of March, Donald Trump’s coronavirus task force extended national guidelines to prevent the spread of coronavirus, which includes not holding social gatherings with more than 10 people and only leaving the home for essential purposes, like for food or to seek medical attention.

Trump also predicted last month that the country would be back up and running like normal by Easter, which is April 12. But he very quickly walked back on that claim, admitting that the peak of deaths and cases would likely fall around Easter instead.

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Police search for teen who attacked Asian woman for ‘causing’ the coronavirus

Police are still searching for a teenaged girl they say hit an Asian woman in the head with an umbrella on an MTA bus in The Bronx  — while yelling that the woman had “caused the coronavirus.”

The hate crime attack took place on a Bx13 bus on March 28, a Saturday, at around 3 p.m.

The suspect and three 15-year-old girls allegedly approached a 51-year-old Asian woman as they rode together through the Highbridge neighborhood.

All four attacked the victim, calling her “bitch” and asking why she wasn’t wearing a mask — and blaming her for the global COVID-19 outbreak, police said.

They fled the bus after the attack, police said.

The victim was taken to a local hospital and received stitches for a cut to her head, police said.

The three 15-year-olds were apprehended near the scene shortly after the incident.

They face charges for hate crime assaults, menacing and harassment.

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China owes Britain £351 billion for coronavirus pandemic and we should take them to court, study claims – The Sun

CHINA owes Britain £351billion in coronavirus compensation and the government should pursue it through the international courts, a study has concluded.

An investigation into the crisis has claimed the horrific impacts of coronavirus could have been mitigated if China had just been more honest about the outbreak.

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The report, to be published tomorrow by the Henry Jackson Society (HJS), a British foreign policy think-tank, claims China directly breached international healthcare treaty responsibilities.

It also argues there are ten legal avenues major nations – such as Britain – could take to pursue damages from Beijing.

Experts calculated the G7, the world’s leading economies, face a bill of £3.2trillion.

And they said this could have been avoided if the Communist Party was more open about coronavirus, reports The Mail on Sunday.

Britain’s slice of the compensation would be used to cover the full costs of the treasury’s economic bailout plan and the hike in NHS spending to manage the crisis.

World governments have been forced to inject huge sums of cash into their economies to keep them going, helping to prop up businesses and support laid off or furloughed workers.

HJS experts concluded the Communist Party “sought to conceal bad news at the top” and to “conceal bad news from the outside world”.

It comes as British ministers are now reportedly not discounting the theory that coronavirus actually came from a leak from a Chinese lab in Wuhan.

And meanwhile, the report has spurred a group of 15 top Tories to call on Prime Minister Boris Johnson to “rethink and reset” the United Kingdom’s relationship with China.

In a joint letter, the four former Cabinet ministers and 11 MPs said they are worried about the “damage to the rules-based system caused by China’s non-compliance with international treaties”.

The report is titled “Coronavirus Compensation: Assessing China's potential culpability and avenues of legal response” and argues the Chinese government actively covered-up the coronavirus outbreak.

HJS experts say key decisions in the early days of the outbreak, such as not cancelling flights from London to Wuhan, were directly skewed by misinformation from China.

The report reads: “The truth is that China is responsible for Covid-19 – and if legal claims were brought against Beijing they could amount to trillions of pounds.”

Britain could bring a case against China at the Permanent Court of Arbitration at The Hague against China for breaking sanitary commitments, or it could got to the UN and International Court of Justice, or bring it up with the World Trade Organisation

In their letter to the PM, the 15 Tories, led by former deputy PM Damian Green, write: “Legally binding international healthcare regulations require states to provide full information on all potential pandemics. It appears likely that in its early response to the outbreak, the uphold its obligations.

“This omission allowed the disease to spread throughout the world with extraordinarily serious consequences in terms of global health and the economy.

“The cost to the UK may be, as a Henry Jackson Society report now suggests, over £350 billion.”

China has been openly accused of concealing details of the outbreak in its early stages, such as the death toll and spread of the virus.

British government officials met on January 13 and concluded the risk to the population was “very low”.

This was based on information from China, who claimed there was no significant “human to human transmission” and no evidence of medics getting the disease.
Advice based on Chinese data continued to be used throughout January, and then one day before the end of the month coronavirus reached the UK.

From then the number of infections has skyrocketed, with Britain suffering its deadliest day yesterday as 708 were confirmed dead – raising the total to 4,353.

More than 41,000 people have now been infected, Britain is on total lockdown, and heroic healthcare workers are giving their lives to fight coronavirus.

HJS experts argue this could have been avoided if China had just fessed up and come clean.

Bob Seeley MP said: “Once we are through this crisis, we need to reassess our ability to deal with non-traditional threats to our society, be they economic, political or, in this case, a pandemic.

“We can't go through this shock again without being better prepared.”

The 15 MPs called on the Government to “rethink out wider relationship with China” off the back of the report.

In their letter, they added: “Over time, we have allowed ourselves to grow dependent on China and have failed to take a strategic view of Britain's long-term economic, technical and security needs.”

China is now facing pressure to come clean over the outbreak, with even US President Donald Trump speculating their figures may not be accurate.

It emerged today British security services are reportedly no longer ruling out the possibility that coronavirus leaked from a Chinese research lab in Wuhan.

Reportedly while intelligence still suggests that the virus originated from animals, the leak hypothesis is now no longer “discounted”.

A member of the emergency Cobra committee has been reported as saying the theory is now seen as a “credible” alternative.

Chinese embassy officials in London have said speculation about a cover-up disregards “tremendous efforts and huge sacrifice of China and its people”.

In a statement, an embassy spokesman added: “There has been no scientific or medical conclusion yet on the origin of Covid-19, as relevant tracing work is still underway.

“The WHO has made repeated statements that what the world is experiencing now is a global phenomenon, the source is undetermined, the focus should be on containment and any stigmatizing language referring to certain places must be avoided.”

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China is believed to have tried to downplay the initial outbreak as the virus took hold in the city of Wuhan.

A doctor who first warned about the virus was threatened by police, and then last month Chinese officials suggested the US military may have been responsible for coronavirus.

China now claims it has weathered the virus storm, and yesterday mourned victims with a three minute silence as it positions itself as a world leader amid the pandemic.

The death toll for the nation is just over 3,300, and the number of cases is around 82,000.

While once China was leading the figures, the US, Spain, Italy, France and Germany have all surged ahead.

The global infection count is now over 1.2million, with America facing over 300,000 cases.

However, it has been speculated the China's death toll is much higher – with suggestions Wuhan alone could be as many as 42,000.

US congressman Michael McCaul accused China of the “one of the worst cover-ups in human history” last month while speaking on Fox News.

He accused the Communist Party of a “systematic whitewash” and called for an international investigation to “hold the Chinese government to account”.

Mr McCaul, a Republican member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, said: “Now we have a global pandemic that originated out of Wuhan.

“They allowed millions of people to come to Wuhan to celebrate their Spring festival.

“Five million of them leading the area and traveling domestically and abroad – they went into laboratories and shut them down – destroyed laboratory samples and they detained eight of the doctors trying to speak the truth about what really happened in Wuhan.”

Half the world’s population are now in lockdown as governments attempt to slow the spread of the virus.

Only 18 nations in the world are yet to confirm an infection – including North Korea, Yemen and a number of nations in the South Pacifc.

And as the UK bathes in sunshine this weekend sparking fears of the virus spreading, The Queen is due to address the nation tonight at 8pm.

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Spain's coronavirus death toll rises by its lowest amount this week

Spain’s coronavirus death toll rises by its lowest amount this week for a third consecutive day with an increase of 674 raising fresh hope lockdown is working

  • Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez said State of Emergency must stay in place
  • Deaths in the country have now reached 12,418, and there are 130,759 cases
  • State of Emergency has been extended twice since it was begun on March 14 

There are growing signs Spain’s strict coronavirus lockdown may be working, as the country records its lowest death toll for a third consecutive day. 

The country has said a further 674 people died from the disease in the last 24 hours, taking its total to 12,418. This marks a drop from yesterday’s 809 deaths in the world’s second-worst hit country.

Coronavirus cases also rose by 6,023 to 130,759, the lowest rise for the fifth consecutive day.

Spain’s lockdown has been extended for the third time. Pictured is Pedro Sanchez visiting a medical factory in Mostoles, Spain,on Friday

Pedro Sanchez pictured during a visit to a factory producing medical supplies in Madrid

A pharmacist wears a mask as he walks through an empty square in Madrid yesterday

Prime minister Pedro Sanchez extended Spain’s State of Emergency for another 15 days yesterday until April 26, but said the ‘top of the curve is in sight’.

He told the country they are ‘close’ to defeating the virus and said Spain would begin to make a transition to ‘recover some of our economic and social life’.

He added that the extension was needed ‘in order to give time to the health system to recover’. 

He also said the State of Emergency could not be lifted due to the continuing escalation in deaths. It marked the second time it has been extended since coming into force on March 14.

Madrid, the capital, has recorded the highest number of deaths from coronavirus in the country, at 4,941, followed by Catalonia, which has recorded 2,637 deaths.

Andalusia, which includes the Costa del Sol, has recorded 8,301 cases and 470 deaths. 

Funeral workers pictured preparing to bury a coffin as Spain is gripped by coronavirus

Mortuary workers wear face masks and gloves as they carry a coffin in Madrid yesterday

Spain recorded its highest number on Thursday this week, at 950. 

Health chiefs say although the actual number of coronavirus infections is stabilising, the situation could worsen if confinement orders were lifted.

The government’s current strategy aims to lift the restrictions after the Easter holidays, reports El Pais. 

Spain has recorded the second highest number of deaths from coronavirus in the world, with its numbers only being surpassed by Italy. 

Two workers and a relative attend the burial of a coronavirus victim in Madrid yesterday

A woman cheers for health workers from her home in Ronda, south Spain, on April 3

The Prime Minister needs the support of Spain’s lower house, the Congress of Deputies, to extend the alarm but Pablo Casado, the leader of the conservative Popular Party (PP) has been increasingly critical of the government’s handling of the crisis. 

He recently accused the Socialist leader of ‘improvising’ and said his way of dealing with the coronavirus crisis was an ‘explosive cocktail of arrogance, incompetence and lies’.

Spain is also working on new advice and measures, including advising all Spaniards to wear face masks when outside. 

At the moment, however, there are insufficient stocks to give to the entire population. 

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Former Italian PM Silvio Berlusconi's £8.9 million yacht up for sale

Former Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi’s £8.9 million superyacht, previously owned by media mogul Rupert Murdoch, is up for sale

  • Berlusconi, 83, bought Morning Glory from the tycoon for £4.5m back in 1999
  • The yacht is 158ft long and can cater for 10 passengers across its luxury cabins 
  • Murdoch owned it for six years and even wed third wife, Wendy Deng, on board 

Former Italian prime minister Silvio Berlusconi has put his £8.9 million superyacht up for sale.

The 83-year-old tycoon, known for his ‘bunga bunga’ sex parties, bought Morning Glory from Rupert Murdoch in 1999.

It was the media mogul who originally commissioned the boat, which he enjoyed for six years, and even married his third wife, Wendy Deng, on board. 

Morning Glory, pictured, is 158ft (48m) long, and can cater for 10 passengers across its luxury cabins, along with eight crew

He then sold the watercraft to Berlusconi for an estimated £4.5m, who was previously seen sailing in Antigua, where he has a holiday home. 

The former AC Milan owner bought Morning Glory to replace another yacht, Principessa Vaivia, and and was looking to build a new deepwater dock to accommodate it on the Caribbean island. 

Built by the Perini Navi shipyard in Italy, the vessel is 158ft (48m) long, and can cater for 10 passengers across its luxury cabins, along with eight crew.

One of the few all-white Perini Navi yachts, it boasts impressive furnishings including a working wood and marble fireplace. 

Its interior is finished ‘in a modern and masculine nautical style with tons of wood paneling’, according to Business Insider. 

Silvio Berlusconi, pictured, bought the yacht from media mogul Rupert Murdoch for £4.5m back in 1999

Morning Glory sails along at a speed of 14.8 knots, or 17mph, and holds 42,000 litres of fuel. 

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Royal protection officers for Anne, Andrew and Edward have their firearms replaced by Tasers – The Sun

ROYAL protection officers for Anne, Andrew and Edward have had their firearms replaced by Tasers.

It is thought police guarding Harry and Meghan on visits back to the UK from their LA home will also just have the stun guns.

The “drastic measure” is part of a wide-ranging reduction of armed police protection for junior royals, politicians and diplomats.

Armed cover for the Princess Royal and brothers Andrew — who has withdrawn from public life over the Jeffrey Epstein affair — and Edward was removed in the past three weeks.

Met Police personal protection officers guarding the Queen, Prince Philip, Charles and William will continue to carry Glock pistols.

The cuts, boosting terror and gang crime cover amid a shortage of firearms officers, have caused anger.

Officers have also been told that their duties are now “advisory” and they are not to engage with potential attackers.

One source commented: “It has caused a lot of angst among firearms officers who until now have been trained to take a bullet if need be.”

Another said: “What are they supposed to do if it kicks off? Not intervene if someone is in danger but just shout advice at them? It’s crazy.”

Princess Anne was shot at in a 1974 kidnap attempt by Ian Ball.

Ex-Met Flying Squad commander John O’Connor said: “There are still people like Ball out there, dangerous lone wolves who nobody knows about.

“Replacing firearms with Tasers is nonsensical.

“The stun guns are hopeless over any kind of range.

“Even if they do hit the target, there have been examples where they have not managed to stop an attacker.”

The Royalty and VIP Executive Committee, a Home Office group, decides who gets armed protection.

The Met refused to comment.

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One in five Britons don't wash their pillows for FIVE YEARS

Sweet dreams? One in five Britons admits to sleeping on a pillow they haven’t washed in FIVE YEARS or more

  • Poll of 2,000 people discovered 20 per cent of them didn’t wash pillows often 
  • Women were much worse offenders than men, according to Silentnight study
  • Research warned that about ten per cent of the weight of a pillow that has not been washed for two years was made up of dust mites and dead skin cells 

One in five Britons admits to sleeping on a pillow they haven’t washed in five years or more.

A poll of 2,000 people discovered that 20 per cent of them confessed that they had used the same pillows for at least the past five years and had never washed them.

The study by bedding firm Silentnight also found that a further 41 per cent of us hadn’t washed our pillows in the past two years.

A poll of 2,000 people discovered that 20 per cent of them confessed that they had used the same pillows for at least the past five years and had never washed them (stock image)

The research warned that about ten per cent of the weight of a pillow that has not been washed for two years was made up of dust mites and dead skin cells. 

For pillows not washed for five years or more, that rocketed to almost 25 per cent of the weight of a pillow.

Surprisingly, women were much worse offenders than men, with just 35 per cent saying that they had washed the pillows in the past two years, compared to 45 per cent of men.

A spokesman for Silentnight said that not washing pillows could lead to a variety of allergies, including hay-fever-like symptoms and even eczema and asthma.

A study by bedding firm Silentnight also found that a further 41 per cent of us hadn’t washed our pillows in the past two years (stock image)

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Clooney chum's journey from an anti-royal Trot to knight of the realm

Clooney chum’s journey from an anti-royal Trot to knight of the realm: Can Sir Keir Starmer, who focus groups find ‘dull, wooden and too lawyerly’, really make inroads into the Tories’ electoral lead?

As he knelt before Prince Charles in the Buckingham Palace ballroom, Keir Starmer’s emotions were characteristically difficult to read. Did his heart swell with pride as the knighting sword tapped his shoulder. Or did he feel a little conflicted?

After all, reflecting some years earlier, the lawyer said: ‘I got made a Queen’s Counsel, which is odd since I often used to propose the abolition of the monarchy.’

Yet he left his investiture in 2014 as a knight of the realm in recognition of his services to criminal justice and, however much it irked him, with his Establishment credentials firmly consolidated.

Some friends found the honour hard to reconcile with the firebrand politics of Starmer’s youth, just as they were discomfited when he led the Crown Prosecution Service, having previously been on the ‘other side’ as a defence barrister.

As he knelt before Prince Charles in the Buckingham Palace ballroom, Keir Starmer’s emotions were characteristically difficult to read. Did his heart swell with pride as the knighting sword tapped his shoulder. Or did he feel a little conflicted?

His knighthood has been ridiculed, too, by members of Labour’s hard Left, who say he is an Establishment stooge.

Starmer won yesterday’s vote because he convinced an outright majority of members that he is best placed to draw together Labour’s disparate elements. Calling for an end to factionalism and purges, he appealed to moderate centrists while placating radical Corbynistas.

‘I am a socialist,’ he told his local paper, the Camden New Journal. ‘I’m driven by the very deep inequalities that we’ve now got across the country of every sort: income, wealth, health, influence – it’s deeply ingrained.’

Pitching to Corbyn supporters, he promised ‘a very forward-looking radicalism’. Some critics cried opportunism but, of course, that is the trademark of most modern politicians. The bigger question now is whether the man who focus groups find ‘dull, wooden and too lawyerly’ can make inroads into the Tories’ electoral lead. Perhaps in an attempt to enliven his image, Starmer confided in a New Statesman interview last week that he moisturises every night.

Born in 1962, his father, Rod, was a tool designer, his mother, Jo, a nurse who suffered from Still’s disease, a rare auto-immune disorder characterised by fevers and rashes. Starmer spent long nights at her side in hospital – being inspired by her courage and devotion.

Starmer (pictured with his wife Victoria) won yesterday’s vote because he convinced an outright majority of members that he is best placed to draw together Labour’s disparate elements. Calling for an end to factionalism and purges, he appealed to moderate centrists while placating radical Corbynistas

After studying law at Leeds University and then at Oxford, he flirted with radicalism as part of the ‘editorial collective’ for a fringe magazine that vowed to challenge the ‘capitalist order’ and turn Labour into ‘the united party of the oppressed’.

He duly became a barrister at Middle Temple, where he focused on fighting human rights cases, engaging in battles to get rid of the death penalty in the Caribbean and in African countries. His commitment to the underdog was unstinting and he won many plaudits for it.

In 2008, despite having never prosecuted a criminal case, Starmer was an unorthodox choice as the new head of the CPS as Director of Public Prosecutions.

In a video for his leadership campaign, he claimed to have ‘stood up to the powerful’ as DPP. But others claim he pursued ‘victim-centred’ justice at the expense of the rights of defendants.

He was criticised for following fashionable liberal causes, and he also had to deal with phone-hacking and the Jimmy Savile scandal.

The latter led him to propose altering the tests used to assess complainants’ credibility in sexual violence cases, saying: ‘We cannot afford another Savile moment.’ His reforms culminated in guidance instructing CPS lawyers to focus on the credibility of complaints, rather than that of complainants.

Starmer’s influence on reforms still triggers anger to this day. One such critic is DJ Paul Gambaccini, who was investigated in 2013 over historic sexual abuse but later won damages from the CPS after the case against him was dropped.

Gambaccini accused Starmer of using his position to conduct a ‘witch-hunt’ against celebrities.

‘I have the most negative feelings about Keir Starmer imaginable,’ he said earlier this year. ‘Countless human beings were tormented because of him and he has never apologised. Keir is not only unsuitable to be leader of the Labour Party, he is unsuitable for any public position down to and including dog-catcher.’

I still fear the power of zealots who tolerated antisemitism and thuggery in the Labour Party, says former Home Secretary LORD BLUNKETT  

The long goodbye is over. Jeremy Corbyn’s exit spells the end of the power exercised by the very small clique around him. But it does not spell the end of a much wider group who still control the party’s machinery and decision-making processes.

Proclamations of unity and outbreaks of sweetness and light are, to say the least, premature.

However, at a time of darkness, there is sometimes a small shining light. A dismal chapter has closed in the history of the Labour Party and therefore, too, of this country’s functioning democracy.

After four-and-a-half years, the zealots of the hard-Left no longer hold the Labour Party. Meanwhile, the bulk of the membership has at last woken from its slumbers to recognise the catastrophe that befell the party in December when we suffered our fourth successive General Election defeat and ended up with fewer MPs than during the Michael Foot debacle of 1983.

The long goodbye is over. Jeremy Corbyn’s exit spells the end of the power exercised by the very small clique around him. But it does not spell the end of a much wider group who still control the party’s machinery and decision-making processes. Pictured: the new Labour leader Keir Starmer leaves his home yesterday morning

But this is only a beginning. The control of so many levers remains in the grip of those who tolerated antisemitism, ignored thuggery and bullying, and drove out decent people dedicated to the democratic parliamentary means of improving the lives of others.

The brutal truth is that, removing the influence of those who joined Labour only to destroy it, such as the organisers of the far-Left group Momentum, will require more than benign indifference.

After a similar hard-Left Militant Tendency attempted takeover in the 1980s, I was spat at as I walked into National Executive Committee meetings to play my part in expelling those who had joined Labour with the sole aim of taking over the party and betraying the people who had traditionally supported us.

Sir Keir Starmer’s challenge is to recognise that healing has a lot to do with delivering the right medicine, not merely covering up the wounds.

Inevitably, there is a temptation to concentrate on being a constructive Opposition. But it will not be enough, in the short-term, to articulate the demands for a dramatic improvement in testing for Covid-19 or to accelerate the distribution of personal protection equipment. Labour must also have a vision of how the nation should come together in the long period of recovery.

I supported Lisa Nandy to be leader because she expressed the hopes and fears of so many people who felt forgotten, politically isolated, and in some cases, downright antagonistic to the Labour Party. Her role will be crucial in ensuring those voices are heard.

With billions being spent by the Government to support furloughed workers, on grants and loans to businesses, and to pay for new applicants for Universal Credit, there will no longer be any immediate capacity to rebalance the economy.

Now is the moment for radical, ambitious and forward-looking policies. Not a comfort zone of indecision or complacency, but rather an understanding that the future belongs to the brave. Pictured: Keir Starmer and Jeremy Corbyn

Many jobs will never re-emerge. Many small businesses will never recover. New ways of working, forced by necessity, may result in fewer employees and jobs with entirely different skills.

Most likely, the communities that suffered most from deindustrialisation in the 1980s and 1990s will be hit again. The same people worst affected by the global financial meltdown of 2008.

There will be lasting political consequences, as always after major traumas such as war.

Some think this will bring people together. I am not so sure.

Isolation, separation and the impact of substantial job losses, as well as the wiping out of savings and the loss of income for millions, may have the opposite effect.

All the more reason that Labour’s new leadership breaks from the schoolboy politics of those who surrounded Corbyn and who had no empathy with working people.

By necessity in this coronavirus crisis, the Conservatives have abandoned long-held dogma such as their ideological objections to the role of the State. For its part, Labour must set aside its own dogmas.

As the fourth Labour leader of the last five to be rooted in North London, it will be vital for Keir to reach out and embrace Britons living way beyond the M25.

To those who felt betrayed by Corbyn’s Labour, there must be a clear signal of internal change and party direction, as Tony Blair understood when driving through reforms to Labour’s constitution and dropping a commitment to State ownership.

The people whose votes we lost need to believe that we have really changed, and reverted back to the party that they loyally supported for generations and believed represented their interests.

Now is the moment for radical, ambitious and forward-looking policies. Not a comfort zone of indecision or complacency, but rather an understanding that the future belongs to the brave.

Hard left bullies spoil coronation for Labour’s new leader: Sir Keir Starmer storms to victory only to face immediate threat from activists not to betray Jeremy Corbyn’s legacy

    Sir Keir Starmer stormed to victory in the Labour leadership race yesterday only to face an immediate threat from hard-Left activists not to betray Jeremy Corbyn’s legacy.

    The fervently pro-Corbyn Momentum group reacted to Sir Keir’s overwhelming triumph by vowing to hold the new leader to account ‘and make sure he keeps his promises’.

    But the threat sparked fury from many MPs last night, with even one former Corbyn ally saying that such was the scale of the new leader’s victory that the hard-Left was now ‘just howling at the moon’.

    In a decisive result, Sir Keir defeated ‘Corbyn continuity’ candidate Rebecca Long-Bailey and Wigan MP Lisa Nandy by winning more than 50 per cent of the vote in the first round.

    Sir Keir Starmer stormed to victory in the Labour leadership race yesterday only to face an immediate threat from hard-Left activists not to betray Jeremy Corbyn ‘s legacy

    He was the top choice of party members, affiliates and registered supporters with 56 per cent of the vote – way ahead of Ms Long- Bailey on 28 per cent and Ms Nandy on 16 per cent.

    As Sir Keir already has the backing of most Labour MPs, party insiders said he was in a far more powerful position than Mr Corbyn ever was and could ‘take out’ the hard-Left if he wanted to.

    In a further blow to the Left, schools spokesman Angela Rayner was elected deputy leader with ardent Corbynite Richard Burgon pushed into third place.

    However, Sir Keir – who has promised to keep key Corbyn policies such as nationalising the rail and water industries – still left some MPs mystified last night over how different he would be.

    There is deep concern from Northern, Brexit-supporting Labour MPs over how Sir Keir, who backed Remain and represents a North London constituency, could appeal to the ‘Red Wall’ of seats lost to the Tories at the Election.

    And there has also been disappointment for years that while the Tories have had two female leaders, Labour refuses to give a woman the top job. Harriet Harman bemoaned this two years ago, saying: ‘It’s becoming a bit of a thing.’

    In an acceptance speech delivered via the internet because of the coronavirus crisis, Sir Keir warned his party had ‘a mountain to climb’ and that if change was required ‘we will change’.

    The fervently pro-Corbyn Momentum group reacted to Sir Keir’s overwhelming triumph by vowing to hold the new leader to account ‘and make sure he keeps his promises’

    But Sir Keir, who during the contest was careful not to antagonise Corbyn supporters, continued that approach yesterday by paying tribute to the former leader ‘as a friend as well as a colleague’ but vowing on antisemitism to ‘tear out the poison by its roots’.

    The promise failed to quell criticisms that he had failed to speak out strongly enough over the party’s handling of the issue while serving as Mr Corbyn’s Shadow Brexit Secretary.

    His spokesman also denied reports that he had already told Mr Corbyn’s former chief of staff Karie Murphy, strategy director Seumas Milne and party general secretary Jennie Formby that they would have to leave.

    Momentum, set up originally to protect Mr Corbyn’s leadership, responded with congratulations to Sir Keir but tweeted: ‘In this new era, Momentum will play a new role.

    ‘We’ll hold Keir to account and make sure he keeps his promises.’  

    Oxford MP Anneliese Dodds is being touted for Shadow Chancellor as Sir Keir today takes the key step of naming his front bench. Moderates are urging him to clear out Corbynista ‘dead wood’.

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    Coronavirus nurse, 23, collapses and dies at home after 12-hour shift as mum says he didn’t have right protective kit – The Sun

    A NHS nurse collapsed and died after working a 12 hour shift battling on the frontlines against the deadly coronavirus.

    John Alagos is the third nurse and the youngest British medic believed to have died from the deadly COVID-19.

    ⚠️ Read our coronavirus live blog for the latest news & updates

    After returning home from work on Friday following a night shift, John complained about suffering from a headache and a high temperature throughout the night, his mother told the The Mail on Sunday.

    Mrs Gustilo said that she had told her son to take some paracetamol before going to bed.

    She said: "After a few minutes, I found him turning blue in his bed."

    Mrs Gustilo immediately called the emergency services but paramedics were not able to resuscitate him.

    The devastated mum told The Mail on Sunday that her son told her that he had not been wearing the proper protective clothing while at work.

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    But while they are helping save lives, who is there to help them?

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    John was treating coronavirus patients at Watford General Hospital which declared a "critical incident" and shut their A&E department after a problem with their oxygen supplies.

    As of Saturday night the "critical incident" has ended and patients can attend Watford General as usual.

    Ms Gustilo said that her son did not have any underlying medical conditions.

    Tracey Carter, chief nurse at Watford General Hospital, told Sun Online: “Our staff are fully briefed on the symptoms of COVID-19 and we would never expect anyone to remain at work if they were showing these symptoms or indeed were unwell in any way.

    "We have always kept our staff updated on the latest PPE guidance to make sure they have the right level of protection for where they are working.

    "John was very popular and will be missed greatly by his colleagues. We cannot comment further on the cause of death at this stage."

    Last week two other nurses died of coronavirus believed to have been infected by patients.

    Areema Nasreen, a mum-of-three who had no underlying conditions, died in intensive care at Walsall Manor Hospital, where she had worked for 16 years.

    39-year-old Aimee O'Rourke, who is also a mother of three, died in intensive care at Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Hospital in Margate, Kent where she worked.

    The UK's death toll has increased by 708 to 4,353 in the last 24 hours, the UK's worst day ever.

    A five-year-old child, who had an underlying health condition, has become Britain's youngest coronavirus victim.

    The young victim is now believed to be the youngest Covid-19 death in Europe after a 12-year-old girl passed away in Belgium earlier this week.

    Previously, Britain's youngest coronavirus victim was "very healthy" 13-year-old Ismail Mohamed Abdulwahab, who died in hospital in London on Monday.

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    How Boris is taking lessons from his hero Churchill

    How Boris is taking lessons from his hero Churchill: ANDREW ROBERTS on how the Prime Minister is using Winston’s playbook to guide him through the coronavirus crisis

    It is a sobering thought, as Boris Johnson emerges from self-isolation, that coronavirus would probably have killed Winston Churchill had he caught it any time between his first serious bout of pneumonia in May 1943 and his fourth in February 1945. 

    Churchill was a male smoker in his 70s with a serious underlying health condition – a prime target for what Boris has dubbed ‘the invisible killer’. 

    Our wartime Premier, who survived Pathan spears in 1897, Dervish scimitars in 1898, Boer bullets in 1899 and German shells in 1916, would weirdly have been finally felled by a Chinese penchant for eating bats. 

    Even if he had died in 1943, however, and had never lived to see the Nazis defeated, Churchill would still have left a legacy of leadership second to none in world history. 

    Winston Churchill making the victory gesture outside of 10 Downing Street in June 1943

    As is clear from rereading Boris’s 2014 book The Churchill Factor that leadership has provided the template for our present Prime Minister’s entire approach to combating coronavirus, once the very different 21st Century peacetime – rather than 20th Century wartime – conditions are taken into account. 

    There was nothing invisible about the Luftwaffe, for example. So many of Boris’s stances in the present crisis derive straight from the Churchill playbook that it cannot be pure coincidence. 

    His early statement that loved ones would die provoked widespread criticism as supposedly hyperbolic and scaremongering, yet it was essential that he level with the British people in straightforward terms about the true nature of the threat. 

    Churchill was also criticised for making his first speech as Prime Minister about how the British people would need to expend ‘blood, toil, tears and sweat’ to win the war, yet it was the right thing to do. 

    In September 1939, there had been official estimations of the total number of deaths from German bombing in the several hundreds of thousands, figures not unlike Imperial College’s prediction of 260,000 British deaths from coronavirus. 

    These prompted the government to close schools and evacuate children – in wartime to the countryside, today to their homes. 

    We sometimes forget that in our Finest Hour, some Britons engaged in panic-buying, hoarding and occasionally even looting during the Blitz, but they were condemned and despised by the majority of the population. 

    Far more widespread was an admirable altruistic instinct, one that thankfully still exists today and which the Johnson Government has unleashed superbly. 

    When on June 14, 1940, the War Office called for volunteers for what was to become the Home Guard, they expected half a million people to enlist. 

    In fact, one-and-a-half million did. Similarly, when the NHS asked for volunteers last month, they expected 100,000 or so to answer the call, whereas nearly three-quarters of a million brave and selfless Britons now have. 

    The sweeping new powers that the Johnson Government has given the police to use, if necessary, to enforce the lockdown are a powerful echo of the ’18B Regulation’ instituted by Churchill’s Government in May 1940. 

    Churchill considered imprisonment without trial to be ‘in the highest degree odious’, as he put it, and Boris has likewise said that ‘no Prime Minister’ wants to have to do what he has done either, but the public trust him to implement these powers in a restrained, intelligent, British way, which they overall have been (except perhaps in Derbyshire). 

    Looking to his hero, Johnson had no qualms in effectively nationalising the British economy overnight when the scale of the looming catastrophe became apparent, much as Churchill did in the period of Total War. 

    ‘He emerges as a man determined to palliate suffering,’ Boris writes of Churchill’s economic views, adding that, during the Great Depression, ‘it was a time to allay discontent, to abate the anger of the dispossessed; to help stave off revolt by providing the statefinanced response to manifest social injustice’. 

    In both Churchill’s and Johnson’s cases, the British people trust these massive incursions of the State into every aspect of British economic life to be as limited and short-lived as possible, unlike how they would be under a Corbyn government. 

    ‘To keep people together at a moment of profound anxiety,’ Boris writes of Churchill, ‘you need to ‘connect’ with them in a deep and emotional way. 

    It was not enough to appeal to the logic of defiance. He couldn’t just exhort them to be brave. He needed to engage their attention, to cheer them, to boost them. 

    Boris Johnson waves outside number 10 after delivering his first speech as Prime Minister in Downing Street Prime Ministerial handover, London, UK – 24 Jul 2019

    To move the British people, he needed at some level to identify with them – with those aspects of their character that he, and they, conceived to be elemental to the national psyche.’ 

    The 79 per cent of people who agree with the lockdown, and Boris’s own catching of coronavirus (though, of course, that was involuntary), are testament to his ability to connect, and are reminiscent of the 85 per cent of people who the Mass Observation organisation found supported Churchill during the Blitz. 

    Of course, Churchill was fortunate not to have the BBC to contend with, with its present-day interviewers insisting on Radio 4’s Today programme that Ministers ‘come clean’ over how long the lockdown will last, as though the Government had an exact date in mind and was deliberately covering it up. 

    Boris wrote that Churchill in 1940 was ‘patriotic to a degree that many have always considered hyperbolical and unnecessary, but which now, in the present crisis, seemed utterly right’. 

    What a shame, then, that the BBC’s constant griping against the Government presents such a tin ear to the public’s needs in this crisis, treating this massive national emergency as though it’s normal, Brexit-era business as usual. 

    In reply to the sneers of the antiChurchill historian Richard Toye, Boris has written: ‘Surely it doesn’t detract from Churchill’s reputation that he had robust criticism.’ 

    It certainly doesn’t, and fortunately the BBC’s carping attacks on Boris seem to have borne no fruit, with him enjoying a 72 per cent personal approval rating. 

    The speed with which the new Nightingale Hos­pital in London and the other huge regional hospitals are being created from scratch is a reason to feel pride in Britain, and is reminiscent of the sense of urgency that Churchill’s friend Lord Beaverbrook put into aircraft production in 1940. 

    One hesitates to equate Spitfires and ventilators as no historical parallels are ever exact – and Boris obviously did not foresee the virus threat in the way that Churchill long foresaw the Nazi one – but the fact is that British ingenuity and can-do attitude is being tested today, with even tighter schedules than in 1940, and not being found wanting. 

    Just as the organisation of the Norway Campaign was an embarrassing failure for Churchill during the Phoney War in April and May 1940, the dearth of coronavirus testing kits is clearly not the Government’s finest hour so far, but it will not define the story so long as Boris gets it sorted as soon as possible, as it is clear that he is straining every nerve to do. 

    Churchill’s liking for and trust in scientists such as Professor Frederick Lindemann, R.V. Jones and Sir Barnes Wallis – inventor of the Dambusters’ bouncing bombs – gave him a special edge not vouchsafed to many Prime Ministers, although he famously also said that scientists ‘should be on tap, not on top’.

    Boris has also surrounded himself with trustworthy, even scholarly figures such as Professor Chris Whitty, the Chief Medical Officer, and Sir Patrick Vallance, the Chief Scientific Adviser, who exude a sense of calm professionalism. 

    ‘There are so many people who have secretly or openly regarded his life as a pattern, example, inspiration and role model for their own,’ Boris has written of Churchill. 

    ‘That is why we need to dig into his essential nature.’ 

    As we stand perhaps still over a year away from a vaccine – as far as the Blitz was from Pearl Harbor – we can at least feel ourselves fortunate that our present leader is such a diligent student of the essential nature of Winston Churchill. 

    Andrew Roberts’s Churchill: Walking With Destiny is published by Penguin. 

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